Text Box: The Elements of Axiomatic Design
A special seminar at WPI (www.wpi.edu ) to introduce axiomatic design as a powerful engineering tool…
  all are welcome

WPI, 229 Washburn Building
5:00-7:00pm Tuesday evening 14 September 2004
Prof. Christopher A. Brown, PhD, PE
                                                                               

 

In this special, two-hour seminar Prof. Chris Brown will cover enough about axiomatic design so that participants will be able to apply it to a variety of design problems, including design of products, manufacturing processes, tools, and a variety of systems.  Axiomatic design, which was developed in the 70’s at MIT by Prof. Nam Suh, can be used for many things, including manufacturing systems (to go beyond rote application of Lean).  Axiomatic design is special because it identifies two axioms, or laws, that all good designs obey: maximizing independence and minimizing complexity, or information.  In order to apply these axioms to reasonably sophisticated design problems, the design must be represented in corresponding functional and physical hierarchies.  The process for decomposing designs into appropriate hierarchies will also be discussed.  In addition Prof. Brown will demonstrate Acclaro (http://www.axiomaticdesign.com/), software for representing these decompositions and applying the first axiom.  A portion of the two hour seminar will be devoted to discussing questions from attendees.

 

Prof. Brown has been using axiomatic design to solve industrial design problems since the 80s, and has been teaching it at WPI since 1990.  Formerly a senior engineer at Atlas Copco’s research center in Switzerland, he is currently a professor of Mechanical Engineering at WPI.  He was the director of WPI’s Manufacturing Engineering program during a period of rebuilding the labs, increasing enrollment, and renewing accreditation.  Currently he is the director of the WPI’s Surface Metrology Laboratory (http://www.me.wpi.edu/Research/SurfMet/) and of WPI’s Haas Technical Center for Computer-controlled Machining (http://www.me.wpi.edu/MFE/HCCM/).  He teaches courses on the design and analysis of manufacturing processes, surface metrology, and the technology of alpine skiing.  He is also the senior faculty advisor for WPI’s accelerated CNC course for engineers (http://www.me.wpi.edu/MFE/Summer/).

 

 

 

Space is limited. 

Please email Prof. Chris Brown to confirm a seat: brown@wpi.edu